AIS 275 B: Introductory Topics In American Indian And Indigenous Studies

Canoe Culture, Traditional Foods, and the Montlake Cut: Engaging with UW's Campus Ecology

Course Flyer: 
Meeting Time: 
TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
Location: 
MLR 316
SLN: 
10223
Instructor:
Cynthia Updegrave
Cynthia Updegrave

Syllabus Description:

 Canoe Culture, Traditional Foods, and the Montlake Cut: Engaging with UW's Campus Ecology

 Instructor Cynthia Updegrave

5 credits I&S - NW available by emailing elissaw@uw.edu

Meets Tuesday and Thursday 3:30 - 5:20

cupdegra@uw.edu

Office Hours: by appointment

 

(photo)

Camas and bunchgrass meadow planting at wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ, the Intellectual House

Course background

These waterways have been home to Coast Salish people since time immemorial. Settlers engineered the watershed-altering Montlake Cut and celebrated the opening of the Ship Canal in 1917. In carving out and cementing this passage, sacred places were blasted through with dynamite, and others filled in with debris. Rivers, forests, wetlands, and salmon runs were lost, villages destroyed, and Native people displaced and excluded. How do we engage with the significance this land has held since time immemorial?

 

The many types of cultural activities taking place at wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ provide an opportunity to re-imagine the campus, and frame ecocultural restoration and wealth in terms of relationships. Students will engage in learning experiences with Native communities, elders, activists, and Canoe Families. Coast Salish art, language, and stories provide a context for collaborating with campus resources including the UW Farm and the student-led Society for Ecological Restoration. Students will participate in the hosting of  ”The Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ: Indigenous Foods and Ecological Knowledge Symposium”, and envision actions that decolonize the environs of the campus.

 

If landscape is memory, and time is living, how might we think about the richness of the environs of the university campus? What can it teach us, and how might we begin to bring back the wealth of the abundant land?

 

Course description

Learn about the wealth of abundant life and complexity of the many ecosystems that have existed through time in proximity to the campus; the natural processes, people and cultural relationships that have created, contributed to, and maintained this abundance; as well as the profound impacts to the original people and lands of the campus associated with the settlement and engineering of the City of Seattle. Consider what it means to bring back this wealth while developing a richer understanding for the region through campus walking tours and local field trips. Learn from stories, elders, the Lushootseed language and an introduction to the museums, archives, plant and horticultural resources on campus. Potential class project: organize a community event at wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ, to convene a campus conversation about bringing back the wealth in connection to wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ.

 

wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ the University of Washington’s  Intellectual House.  After many years of visioning and planning, the Intellectual House opened its doors on March 12, 2015 with two days of ceremony and celebration.  The building was given its name in the Lushootseed language by Vi Hilbert, a Lushootseed elder of the Upper Skagit Tribe.  wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ is phonetically pronounced as ‘wah-sheb-altuh.’  It is a longhouse-style facility with a mission to provide Native American students, faculty and staff, and others of various cultures and communities to gather in a welcoming educational environment for sharing knowledge and traditions. 

 

The Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ: Indigenous Foods and Ecological Knowledge Symposium will bring together individuals to share their knowledge on topics such as tribal food justice and security, traditional foods, health, community, place, responsibility, climate change, and treaty rights. Indigenous peoples in the Northwest have maintained a sustainable way of life through a cultural, spiritual, and reciprocal relationship with their environment. This symposium serves to foster dialogue and build collaborative networks as we, Native peoples, strive to sustain our cultural food practices and preserve our healthy relationships to the land, water, and all living things. This year’s symposium is on Friday May 5th and Saturday May 6th, 2017.

 

Texts

 

Required:

Restoring the Pacific Northwest: the Art and Science of Ecological Restoration in Cascadia, Edited by Dean Apostol and Marcia Sinclair; Foreword by Eric Higgs

 

The Earth's Blanket: Traditional Teachings for Sustainable Living, Nancy J. Turner

The Sea Chest, Puget Sound Maritime Journal, Special Theme Issue: Native-Salish Maritime Heritage December/Winter 2016 (copies provided)

The Waterlines Map will provide a visualization of the natural and cultural world as it existed at the time of the treaties.

 

Field Notes to the Future Field Books (copies provided)

 

Recommended:

Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast, by Pojar & MacKinnon (various editions)

 

Resources:

Ethnobotany of Western Washington, by Erna Gunther

Food Plants of Coastal First People, by Nancy Turner

Plant Technology, by Nancy Turner

The Historical Ecology Handbook: a Restorationist’s Guide to Reference Ecosystems, Egan and Howell

Additional Readings Available in Canvas, including:

Winds, Waterways and Weirs, an Ethnographic Study of Seattle’s Light Rail Corridor

 

 

Summary of Evaluation

Evaluation Method     Percent of Grade         Evaluation

 

Journal                         15% (100 pts)              As assigned

 

Weekly Reflection      20% (200 pts)              Turn in each Week     

 

Plant Cards &             10 % (100 pts)             Due week 8

Field Notes

 

Action Activity           15% (100 pts)              Due Week 10

 

Participation                20% (200 pts)              Daily

 

Final Reflection          20% (200 pts)              Due final exam day

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

Course evaluation components

Central to our learning is cultivating a community-based democratic classroom, where respect for multiple ways of knowing is valued and supported. Knowledge is constructed through discussion, engagement with the world around us, inquiry and research.

 

  1. Participation: attendance and active engagement are essential in this course.

 

  1. Weekly Response Paper due Thursdays: a one-paged double spaced response to; or synthesis of, the daily readings is required; this may take a variety of forms; the goal is to integrate new terms, experiences and learning.

 

An example that might help you to get started:

  1. Write out a selected quotation from one of the readings that seems representative of the meaning of the whole article, or set of readings and resources for the day.
  2. Rewrite / restate its meaning in your own words.
  3. Reflection - connect its meaning to other readings/experiences/observations that you have had during the week, or perhaps even a memory.

 

  1. 10 Plant Species and Ethnobotanical Cards, or project of your choice: for an example of good information to include see Starflower Foundation printable cards for an idea of what to include, or use the template to make your own. Include ethnobotanical notes: http://www.wnps.org/education/resources/plantid_cn.html OR better yet, be creative, make your own using sketches and plant material. Can be linked to Campus, Field Notes to the Future and the Waterlines Map.

 

  1. Participation in one or two outside of class-time Gathering, Service, or Action Activity(s): for example gathering nettles for the Living Breath Symposium, volunteer at the Living Breath Symposium, support 100th Anniversary Montlake Cut Tribal Canoe Family Paddle, attend gift making events.

 

  1. Final Activity and Reflection: on exploring the places, stories and relationships connected to wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ.

 

  1. Participation: Attendance and timely arrival to class is essential in this course.

 

 

Course schedule (to be adapted as needed)

Themes

Readings

In class

Assignment Due

Week 1 

3/28 Welcome

Coast Salish World and Stories

Roger Fernandes

 

Welcoming and Introductions: Where are we and why are we here? Community, and Campus

For Thursday: Review texts, Map, Field Notes to the Future; and write your reflection based on in-class story experience and your hopes for your learning this quarter

Landscape as Memory

3/30

 

 

Presentation: Edges and Openings

Seattle Waterlines &

Field Notes to the Future

(Campus Walk option at 1:30-3:15 Wallace Hall ACC 120)

Reflection paper

Week 2

Wealth

4/4

The Earth’s Blanket

Prologue: The Land and the Peoples

1. Wealth and Value in a Changing Land

Reading-based discussion

 

Teachings of the Tree People

 

Presentation: Edges and Openings

 

Language and Story

4/6

Warren King George

Green River Canoe

The Earth’s Blanket

2. Land-based Stories of People and Home Places

3. A Kincentric Approach to Nature

 

 

Reflection paper

Week 3

4/11

 

 

Canoe Readings From Martime Heritage Publication

Campus Walk to Foster Island abilities permitting

 

Ceremony

4/13

The Earth’s Blanket

4. Honouring Nature through Ceremony and Ritual

 

 

 

Extended Campus Walk: abilities permitting

Greenlake or Campus to U Village

Reflection paper

 

 

Week 4

Communities

4/18

The Earth’s Blanket

5. The Balance between Humans and Nature

6. Looking After the Lands and Waters

 

Gary Nabhan campus visit

 

Relationships

4/20

The Earth’s Blanket

7. Everything Is One

8. Finding Meaning in a Contemporary Context

 

Discussion of campus walking experiences

Reflection paper

Extended into

Week 6

The Earth’s Blanket

 

 

 

Relationships

4/25

The Earth’s Blanket

7. Everything Is One

 

8. Finding Meaning in a Contemporary Context

 

Gather and Gifts

 

 

Indigenous presence

4/27

Changes and Indigenous Presence : City of Seattle

Waterlines Map Resources Including Indigenous Atlas of Seattle Place Names

 

Films:

Princess Angeline

 

 

 

Week 7

 

 

 

Resilience

5/2

Restoring the Pacific Northwest: Pacific Northwest Ecosystems

 

1.Northwest Environmental Geography and History

 

2. Ecological Restoration

 

Gather and Gifts

Reflection

5/4

Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ

Restoring the Pacific Northwest

Pacific Northwest Ecosystems

 

3.Bunchgrass Prairies

 

4. Oak Woodlands and Savannas

 

Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ

 

5/5 wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ

 

 

 

5/6 wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ

 

 

 

Week 8

 

 

 

Responsibility

5/9

 

Restoring the Pacific Northwest

Pacific Northwest Ecosystems

5. Old-Growth Conifer Forests

 

Knowledge and perspective bring back the wealth?

 

Ecology

5/11

 

Field Trip Sand Point

Green River Canoe

Peter and Sven

Restoring the Pacific Northwest

Review Chapters 1. through 5.

Lecture on Restoring Pacific Northwest forests and rivers.

Discussion, what is restoration? How does it relate to bringing back the wealth?

 

Reflection

Week  9

 

 

 

Traditional Ecological Knowledge

5/15

Restoring the Pacific Northwest

 

17. Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Restoration Practice

 

Guest

Coast Salish Art, Story, and the campus

 

What is traditional ecological knowledge, as applied to ecological restoration

Art-making

Campus Communities

5/17

Edges and openings in the temperate rainforest

 

Restoring the Pacific Northwest

 

6. Riparian Woodlands

 

7. Freshwater Wetlands

 

8. Tidal Wetlands

Guest Philip Red Eagle

 

 

Reflection

 

 

Develop plan for Plant and Ecosystem Cards

5/20

South Sound Priaires

 

 

 

5/21

Canoe Families

Montlake to Golden Gardens

 

 

 

Week 10

 

 

 

5/23

Imagining the abundant land: bringing back the wealth

What is Medicine?

Mapping the Campus

 

 

Norma Alicia Pino

 

5/25

 

 

Reflection

Week 11

 

 

 

Giving

5/30

 

 

 

6/1

Making meaning

 

 

 

Week 12

 

 

 

Final meeting assigned time is

4:30-6:20 p.m.

Thursday, June 8,

 

 

Final Reflection

 

 

Additional Details:

These waterways have been home to Coast Salish people since time immemorial. Settlers engineered the watershed-altering Montlake Cut and celebrated the opening of the Ship Canal in 1917. In carving out and cementing this passage, sacred places were blasted through with dynamite, and others filled in with debris. Rivers, forests, wetlands, and salmon runs were lost, villages destroyed, and Native people displaced and excluded. How do we engage with the significance this land has held since time immemorial? 

The many types of cultural activities taking place at wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ provide an opportunity to re-imagine the campus, and frame ecocultural restoration and wealth in terms of relationships. Students will engage in learning experiences with Native communities, elders, activists, and Canoe Families. Coast Salish art, language,and stories provide a context for collaborating with campus resources including the UW Farm and the student-led Society for Ecological Restoration. Students will participate in the hosting of “”The Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ: Indigenous Foods and Ecological Knowledge Symposium”, and envision actions that decolonize the environs of the campus.

NW credit will be available to all students who contact native@uw.edu.

Catalog Description: 
Covers introductory topics on current research and readings in American Indian and indigenous studies.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Credits: 
5
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
March 13, 2017 - 9:00pm